Hastings, Bexhill, Icklesham, Fairlight, Winchelsea, St Leonards, Robertsbridge, Brede, Guestling.

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Where do local people turn to for counselling or psychotherapy?

We are in a time when mental health is increasingly recognised as one of the most debilitating illnesses that causes immense distress to many people

At a recent meeting the question of how a person would go about locating a counselling therapist was raised? For many individuals it is such huge step to take, firstly to recognise that there is a problem, then to take steps actively seek help. But where should a person begin?

It is estimated that of those individuals who approach their GP, relatively few actually receive counselling. Many people express dismay at having to wait for lengthy periods only to be rationed into a few sessions of cognitive behavioral therapy.

There is generally a waiting list for over six months to see an NHS psychologist. This is unhelpful as the problem is here-and-now. Sussex counselling can provide immediate access to therapeutic intervention, helping people find strategies to reduce their symptoms in the present, not some time in the distant future

 

East Sussex counselling are currently receiving clients from, Hastings, Bexhill, Icklesham, Fairlight, Winchelsea, St Leonards, Robertsbridge, Brede, Guestling.

Please contact to discuss your situation

Mental illness mostly caused by life events not genetics, argue psychologists

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When a third of all G.P. surgery consultations relate to mental health problems and a half of all adults experience a mental health problem at some point in their lives why is it that the MRC (Medical Health Council) allocate only 3% of their annual research budget on mental health research? Furthermore of this 3% the greatest slice of the pie is spent on genetics and neuroscience.

This seems misappropriation as it is widely recognised that the origins of the majority of mental health problems lie in complex societal factors such as relationships, self perception, employment, resource insecurity to mention a few, rather than biological factors.

In this article published in the Telegraph, 

So it would seem that money goes into machines and not into understanding interpersonal factors

 

Suppressing traumatic memories can cause amnesia, research suggests

It has long been understood in the world of psychotherapy that traumatic experience frequently leads to suppression of unwanted memories. These unwanted memories become locked away in a kind of time capsule, blocked from consciousness these traumatic experiences continue to exist in a person’s subconscious; simultaneously many emotional states or responses associated with the events also become locked into this time capsule. These unconscious processes that continue to exert themselves on individuals perceptions of life and influence everyday actions. Now there is neurological research to corroborate these findings. Suppressing bad memories from the past can block memory formation in the here and now, research suggests. The following study could help explain why those suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other psychological conditions often experience difficulty in remembering recent events.

A recent study (you can read the full article here; Justin C. Hulbert, Richard N. Henson & Michael C. Anderson) “Inducing amnesia through systemic suppression”, explores how forgetting past incidents by suppressing  recollections can create a “virtual lesion” in the brain that casts an “amnesiac shadow” over the formation of new memories. “If you are motivated to try to prevent yourself from reliving a flashback of that initial trauma, anything that you experience around the period of time of suppression tends to get sucked up into this black hole as well,” Dr Justin Hulbert

Decades of research on memory formation show that the hippocampus is essential for constructing new episodic memories. Hippocampal damage irreversibly harms people’s ability to store new memories, causing profound amnesia for life’s events

Reversibly disturbing the hippocampus through optogenetic, electrical and pharmacological interventions temporarily disrupts memory formation. Research indicates that people often downregulate hippocampal activity through cognitive control when they are reminded of an unwelcome event and try to stop retrieval.

Together, these findings imply a striking possibility: if stopping (suppressing) episodic retrieval reduces hippocampal activity, this may broadly disturb all hippocampal functions, including—critically—processes necessary to form and retain new, stable memories.

Retrieval suppression may, in essence, induce a transient ‘virtual lesion’, leaving in its wake, an amnesic shadow for any experiences—whether related or not to the memory being suppressed—that simply have the misfortune of happening near in time to efforts to forget.

Professor Chris Brewin, an expert in PTSD from University College, London, who was not involved in the study.

“I think it makes perfect sense because we know that people with a wide range of psychological problems have difficulties with their everyday memories for ordinary events,” “Potentially this could account for the memory deficits we find in depression and other disorders too.”  (Guardian 15 March 2016)

Talking therapies can be better than pills, but you have to find the right one

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Talking therapies can be seen as a viable alternative to the over-medicalisation of mental health conditions. However, if something has real effectiveness, a transformative power to change life, it also has the ability to make things worse if it is misapplied, the wrong treatment or  done incorrectly.

Letting someone poke around inside your car or laptop is likely to do more harm than good unless the it’s done by someone who is properly qualified to fix it; why shouldn’t the same be applied to a distressed mind?

AdEPT    Is an organisation commited to understanding and Preventing the Adverse Effects of Psychological Therapies. They have published a very useful site promoting and supporting safe therapy for both therapists and clients click the link for more details “supporting safe therapy”